I’m giving a talk about the Android Emulator at AnDevCon Boston

Good news! I’ll be giving this talk again at AnDevCon San Francisco in November. I’ll be updating it based on questions I received in Boston, recent developments from Google and Intel. Also there are some things that I wanted to include in the original that I’ll be adding. Come check it out live in San Francisco!


Two weeks from now, on May 31st, from 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM, I will be giving a talk about the Android Emulator at AnDevCon Boston. It is titled “Becoming More Effective with the Android Emulator”, but in order to spice things up a bit, I’m going to give a it a MythBusters-style twist. The subtitle is “Android Emulator Myths…Busted!”

I’ve really fallen in love with the Android Emulator as part of my Android development workflow. I find it a lot easier to work with than switching over to a device, especially with the advancements that have been made in the past year or so. So I really want to share my insights in how to make it work well for everyone. I’m hoping it encourages more people to discover how useful the Emulator is as a tool in the Android toolbox and use it more regularly.

If you want to attend a pure 100% Android development conference, definitely check out AnDevCon. I’ve been to the previous two events and really enjoyed all the content as well as meeting more of the Android community in person. Also, if you use code “DELAROSA”, you should get an additional $200 off the registration.

Hope to see you there!

Git branching

Here’s my quick notes on a git workflow to create a branch, merge and clean up:

Create a branch named “x”:
git checkout -b x
git branch x
git push origin x
git push -u origin x
git checkout x
git push --set-upstream origin x

Merge a branch “x” back into master:
git checkout master
git pull
git merge x --no-ff
git push

Note that this creates a merge commit to make it easier to find where branches are merged into master.

Clean up branch “x”:
git branch -d x
git push --delete origin x

Update [2013-05-15]: Used the “-u” option with git push so we have one less line when creating a branch. Thanks to @jdriscoll for that tip.
Update [2013-07-11]: Used the “-b” option with git checkout so we have one less line when creating a branch. Thanks to @bobz44 for that tip.